Thread List
Page 1 / 290 Next Page Last Page
Subject#Latest
2 23.08.19
9 16.08.19
33 09.08.19
6 31.07.19
2 31.07.19
2 31.07.19
15 30.07.19
1 23.07.19
2 22.07.19
1 22.07.19
1 22.07.19
1 22.07.19
1 18.07.19
4 16.07.19
2 09.07.19
12 27.06.19
6 27.06.19
3 21.06.19
1 07.06.19
10 27.05.19
1 25.05.19
1 24.05.19
1 23.05.19
5 23.05.19
1 23.05.19
1 17.05.19
1 15.05.19
1 15.05.19
1 12.05.19
7 07.05.19
1 07.05.19
3 03.05.19
1 09.04.19
5 31.03.19
1 27.03.19
8 23.03.19
1 17.03.19
1 16.03.19
1 06.03.19
1 28.02.19
3 28.02.19
4 28.02.19
3 28.02.19
1 18.02.19
18 30.01.19
3 30.01.19
23 25.01.19
1 14.01.19
2 21.12.18
11 19.12.18
Page 1 / 290 Next Page Last Page

When burning bridges is the only option..

 
#1 When burning bridges is the only option..
14/07/2019 10:24

Bushy Ass Manager

..or is it ?

We all know the "proper work ethics" when it comes to resigning; do it professionally, don't come across as emotional and be "politically correct" rather than honest etc.

But is this correct 100 % of the time, or are there any circumstances where you couldn't (and shouldn't) adhere to the "politically correct" behaviour ? E.g. : What would you do if you were seriously misled into a position and it is clear that the management never had (or have) the intentions of keeping their part of the deal ?

Reply  Quote   
 
#2 RE: When burning bridges is the only option..
16/07/2019 06:52

Tony Restell (Top-Consultant.com) to Bushy Ass Manager (#1)

Tricky question. There's obviously the strong desire to right a wrong... and to feel like you've done your part to help others avoid falling into the same trap. But at the same time there's often scope for ambiguity in the circumstances surrounding what you're reporting. If you're reporting a crime that's one thing - and a whistleblower will generally be viewed in a favourable light. But as soon as you're bringing into the open something where there's scope for you to not be impartial then it just introduces an element of doubt and a niggling hesitation in hiring you for any decision maker who is subsequently thinking of employing you but comes across this bridge burning as part of their background checks. So I'd say proceed with extreme caution, all things considered. Hope that helps!

Reply  Quote   
 
#3 RE: When burning bridges is the only option..
16/07/2019 11:12

marsday to Bushy Ass Manager (#1)

..or is it ?

We all know the "proper work ethics" when it comes to resigning; do it professionally, don't come across as emotional and be "politically correct" rather than honest etc.

But is this correct 100 % of the time, or are there any circumstances where you couldn't (and shouldn't) adhere to the "politically correct" behaviour ? E.g. : What would you do if you were seriously misled into a position and it is clear that the management never had (or have) the intentions of keeping their part of the deal ?

I suggest this is still a juncture to be non-emotional but technically (rather than politically) correct.

Establish what ground you are standing on. The 'deal' you made - were the components that management have not kept to part of a deal recorded in a contract, email chain or other recorded communication?

Was there any potential for misinterpretation of who was committing to what?

You say 'seriously misled into a position'. Was the position grossly misrepresented, or was it (being honest with yourself) a case of you choosing not to see/hear the things you didn't want to?

You may arrive at what is actually either a breach of contract, or a frustration of contract (if they arent providing what they promised to ensure the outcomes of the role are achieveable). There are legal remedies for both.

Or if, as may be the case, it's a combination of being misled to a degree (which may be just some overzealous selling on their part) and not enough due diligence on your, then that bridge is one over troubled waters anyway and burning it won't matter.

The walk over bridge option is sit down with management, tell them the role is not as you expected based on the information that was exchanged prior to taking the role (see how you avoid blame but share responsibility here) and you are intending to leave. Ask them for an agreed reference and amicable departure. If they take a more aggressive stance, cite breach/frustration of contract calmly, and again ask for an agreed reference and amicable departure.

Reply  Quote   
 
#4 RE: When burning bridges is the only option..
16/07/2019 11:51

Bushy Ass Manager to marsday (#3)

Thanks for valuable input, guys.

This is a fairly senior position, so the person responsible for hiring me knew exactly what he was doing.

Contract is fairly generic though (naturally, as responsibilities change over time), and unfortunately the debated issues is not recorded in writing, but rather through discussions leading up to final agreement.

Without going into too much detail, let's just say the company I joined really aspire to compete with my previous employer, and the person responsible for hiring med had previous work experience from that company (a fact that also made him more credible in my mind). Overselling is definitely the case.

Regarding due diligence I obviously should have done a better job in hindsight, but at the same time there's always uncertainty involved.

I think the most shocking part for me is that that man who hired me knew at the time his time was up, and he had been let know he was being moved sideways within the organisation.

I've sat down with the new manager and being very honest about the situation and he put in writing afterwards he'd like to get a chance to fix it, but nothing happens. Should also note he refuses to put anything in writing when I ask what he is actually going to fix. Says it all I'm afraid.

This has lead to health issues on my side, and I believe the only thing is to get out ASAP and move on.

Reply  Quote   

Top of Page

ThreadID: 103600

Advertise
Your Jobs!