Thread List
First Page Previous Page Page 112 / 305 Next Page Last Page
Subject#Latest
6 16.02.10
3 16.02.10
7 15.02.10
10 15.02.10
5 15.02.10
8 14.02.10
1 14.02.10
18 13.02.10
8 13.02.10
2 13.02.10
21 13.02.10
14 13.02.10
7 12.02.10
3 12.02.10
13 12.02.10
1 12.02.10
1 12.02.10
4 11.02.10
5 11.02.10
2 11.02.10
17 10.02.10
14 10.02.10
4 10.02.10
7 09.02.10
16 09.02.10
5 09.02.10
6 09.02.10
1 09.02.10
1 05.02.10
1 05.02.10
10 05.02.10
4 05.02.10
6 05.02.10
22 05.02.10
2 05.02.10
3 05.02.10
16 05.02.10
21 05.02.10
1 04.02.10
6 04.02.10
12 04.02.10
1 03.02.10
8 02.02.10
5 02.02.10
4 02.02.10
3 01.02.10
27 01.02.10
5 01.02.10
3 31.01.10
2 31.01.10
First Page Previous Page Page 112 / 305 Next Page Last Page

Math & Quantitative Questions Preparation

 
#1 Math & Quantitative Questions Preparation
18/01/2010 20:41

MathWhizNot

Hi all!

I'm looking for an online resource or something where I can practice my quantitative skills, math, problems, etc.

If there's something around consulting then it's better but a general resource will do just fine.

My background is in engineering and I'm very comfortable with numbers and all. However, I'm kind of slow and have gotten used to using a calculator or excel.

I also get nervous during interviews and freeze and just stare at the number on my paper!

Reply  Quote   
 
#2 RE: Math & Quantitative Questions Preparation
19/01/2010 07:54

Anon to MathWhizNot (#1)

I recommend Applied Fluid Mechanics (6th Edition) by Robert Mott. This will give your skills an excellent workout, in with real-life applications.

http://www.amazon.com/Applied-Fluid-Mechanics-Robert-Mott/dp/0131146807/ref=pd_sim_b_5

Seriously though, I think you're probably worrying about the wrong aspect of the selection process if you studied engineering. You'll likely be up against people who studied modern languages and things like that. They will have great social skills, but no brain. You probably have the opposite problem.

Reply  Quote   
 
#3 RE: Math & Quantitative Questions Preparation
19/01/2010 08:19

David to Anon (#2)

Tony,

Can anon's reply be deleted, please? It belittles the tone of the NuForum. A perfectly valid question has been raised wrt math/quant prep. Why lay into language grads?

Thanks

David

Reply  Quote   
 
#4 RE: Math & Quantitative Questions Preparation
19/01/2010 08:36

Bob to David (#3)

David, get a life. Belittles the tone? WTF.

Anon's reply contains a perfectly valid point about the relative strengths of different groups of candidates.

He's just used a figure of speech called 'hyperbole' to make his point, which I'm sure all the language grads will understand (even without a brain).

Reply  Quote   
 
#5 RE: Math & Quantitative Questions Preparation
19/01/2010 09:30

Anon to Bob (#4)

At least David understands my point.

Basically, if the original poster has a background in engineering, then his analytical skills are likely to be VASTLY above the standard required for consulting. If he even understands the most basic stuff, like being able to solve a linear equation (which, as an engineer, he definitely will), then he will in all likelihood be LEAGUES ahead of many of the other candidates. Heck, half of them probably won't even be able to "do" percentages correctly. And I'm not joking!

Social skills, however, may be pivotal. And lets face it - engineers often lack in this area.

My advice, therefore, is that he may do better to get a haircut and learn how to tie a tie, than to brush up further on his differential calculus.

Reply  Quote   
 
#6 RE: Math & Quantitative Questions Preparation
19/01/2010 09:49

Tony Restell (Top-Consultant.com) to Anon (#5)

David - granted Anon's opening comment isn't the most tactfully put, but the advice that Engineer may be focusing on the wrong things is I think spot on so am leaving intact.

Also I would agree with the sentiment that interviewers tend to be faced with polar opposites when milkround recruiting or recruiting at junior grades; those who have studied numerical degrees and those who have not will perform strongly in different aspects of the interview. There's far more of an upside to be gained by focusing on improving your skills in the area that your degree didn't address than there is in perfecting the area you are already (comparatively) stronger in.

Often actual case study practice will help to overcome these nerves and reassure you that your numerical skills are up to scratch. Most decent career services at university will offer case study practice sessions or resources to allow you to practice at your own convenience. Alternatively I do run occasional case study workshops and the next of these is in 10 days' time - <a href=http://events.top-consultant.com/UK/careerconference.aspx?ID=140>details here</a>.

Tony Restell

Top-Consultant.com

Reply  Quote   
 
#7 RE: Math & Quantitative Questions Preparation
19/01/2010 11:04

R2D2 to MathWhizNot (#1)

Sounds to me that your issue is not your ability with numbers but your confidence at interviews. In reality the problems that you are set at interviews are not likely to be about quantum mechanics and in fact will be simple for someone like you. There are a number of texts you can buy from amazon that will set you maths problems for practice if that's what you think you need but maybe it would be better if you concentrated on some self belief exercises? I would suggest that this should be an area of preparation you should consider before interview as I have similar challenges with the numerical testing that's done.

BTW - I have an MEng and have done ok in consultancy depsite the apparent lack of social skills we engineers have.

Reply  Quote   
 
#8 RE: Math & Quantitative Questions Preparation
19/01/2010 23:46

MathWhizNot to R2D2 (#7)

Thanks guys. I think it might a self confidence or nervousness that I suffer from here.

From my experience, most of the questions that I have been given were rather simple however I just stumble because I try to do the math out loud and that makes me nervous.

Reply  Quote   
 
#9 RE: Math & Quantitative Questions Preparation
20/01/2010 01:09

Anon2 to MathWhizNot (#8)

There is actually a difference between the complex logistical manipulations employed in scientific/engineering degrees, and the raw quantitative reasoning that is often tested at graduate level. I know plenty of PhD Physicists and Engineers who only ever got bronzes in the Mathematical Challenge tests at school and even now don't get particularly high scores in things like the SHL psychometrics or the GMAT numerical section. They are bright, and world-class in their field; their brains just aren't wired for those problems.

Contrary to the first Anon, I would suggest practice with "faster-twitch" and "applied mental arithmetic" problems rather than going for more complex or theoretical ones. There are a number of books you can use that are packed with suitable problems, from the "Testing Series" to the formal GMAT prep materials.

Practice will give you more confidence with these problems and at speed but, as the other posters have mentioned, don't forget to put as much if not preparation into developing your "verbal reasoning" and interpersonal skills.

Reply  Quote   
 
#10 RE: Math & Quantitative Questions Preparation
20/01/2010 01:16

Anon2 to Anon2 (#9)

P.S. interestingly my friends who did geography, law, history, etc. seem to do just as well as the physicists and mathematicians at these tests. The guys I know who are really good at the raw numerical reasoning (Maths Challenge finalists) all did social sciences at uni. A co-incidence that the tests where social scientists do well are the ones used for recruitment to social science businesses such as management consultancy? Perhaps not.

Reply  Quote   
 
#11 RE: Math & Quantitative Questions Preparation
20/01/2010 09:46

Here we go again to Anon (#2)

The post by the 1st anon typifies some of the ridiculous posts on here. It adds absolutely no value and is a completely ridiculous comment. I know several incredibly intelligent and good consultants who studied modern languages.

Reply  Quote   
 
#12 RE: Math & Quantitative Questions Preparation
20/01/2010 10:05

DCF to Here we go again (#11)

Would agree with comments on engineers' aptitudes.

This engineer did very well at the qualitative, "English" bit of thr GMAT and not so well at the quantitative "Maths" bit.

High order conceptual and problem solving maths skills are only loosely related to the type of thing you encounter in these tests. Yes, you should be fine with percentages and such like that some may struggle with, but those arts graduates you are up against are likely the brighter ones who do not really have problems with this type of thing.

In the same way, I wouldn't necessarily expect a star in English literature to automatically do well at the qualitative questions.

These tests are designed to test more general, everyday aptitudes.

Reply  Quote   
 
#13 RE: Math & Quantitative Questions Preparation
20/01/2010 12:14

NDT to MathWhizNot (#1)

I remember at my McK quants test I blitzed in half the time of some other candidates - not becasue I was then an engineer, but because I practiced.

I got an old GMAT prep course and did all the maths tests. It worked wonders on the speed I could do the sums in.

Ignore the replies telling you not to bother. Do bother. Juts becuase you're likely to be good on something doesn't mean you shouldn't work on being excellent.

Don't igore the interpersonals comments though. Question whether this is really an issue for you, and if it is, being aware of it will already help you in your performance.

Reply  Quote   
 
#14 RE: Math & Quantitative Questions Preparation
20/01/2010 13:36

Evil Consultant to NDT (#13)

A complete bunch of opinion-driven, stereotype-based drivel. I know people from all degree backgrounds who are both good and bad at standardised maths tests but I dont mistake this for statistical correlation or the lack of it. Know the bounds of your knowledge.

If you want to get good at the kind of questions, they're going to ask - generally very simple - practice! Personally, I got good at mental arithmetic through working in a pub without an electronic till during my undergrad degree.

EC

Reply  Quote   
 
#15 RE: Math & Quantitative Questions Preparation
20/01/2010 14:38

Anon 3 to Evil Consultant (#14)

Nice try EC, but you won't get away with the same trolling behaviour in the new forum.

The point of all these most recent posts (20th Jan) is that they're saying degree subject is not the driver of success in these assessments - the abilities emerge/are formed earlier/elsewhere. Now let's not get into a nature vs. nature argument.

Reply  Quote   
 
#16 RE: Math & Quantitative Questions Preparation
20/01/2010 15:12

Evil Consultant to Anon 3 (#15)

Anon3,

Please try reading my posts and understanding them before commenting. To summarise what I wrote for those incapable of basic english comprehension, such as yourself:

1) In the absence of any hard data, let's not stereotype

2) Perfect practice makes perfect

My last word on the matter.

EC

Reply  Quote   
 
#17 RE: Math & Quantitative Questions Preparation
20/01/2010 16:40

Here we go again to Evil Consultant (#16)

Anon 3 - are you Reading a different thread? The ridiculous post stated that people who studied modern languages and the such like have no brain. What professional insight does that statement add. My point it is unnecessary and factually incorrect.

I am with Evil Consultant on this.

Reply  Quote   
 
#18 RE: Math & Quantitative Questions Preparation
20/01/2010 17:20

Anon to Here we go again (#17)

To 'Here we go again' - please see Bob and Tony's messages. As a modern languages grad yourself (that much is clear from the passion with which you make your point), you should understand the concept of 'hyperbole'.

Reply  Quote   
 
#19 RE: Math & Quantitative Questions Preparation
20/01/2010 21:27

masterchef to Evil Consultant (#16)

Burned yet again EC!

If you can't stand the heat... use the excuse "last word on the matter"

Reply  Quote   
 
#20 RE: Math & Quantitative Questions Preparation
21/01/2010 10:04

Here we go again to Anon (#18)

Anon - I have a maths degree.

My passion is about wanting people to not make unhelpful and inflammatory comments.

Reply  Quote   
 
#21 RE: Math & Quantitative Questions Preparation
05/02/2010 09:44

Not anon to MathWhizNot (#1)

http://www.mckinsey.com/locations/telaviv/faq/advanced_problem_solving_sample.pdf

Reply  Quote   

Top of Page

ThreadID: 60811

Advertise
Your Jobs!