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Right Course??

 
#1 Right Course??
17/03/2004 13:56

Mike

I am currently a business analyst working for a large utility, but desperately want to get into management consultancy. I am in my first year of studying for a professional diploma in management via the OU, but I am unsure whether this qualification is going to get me into a consultancy, and also if anyone would take me on whilst studying for this (doubtful I know) Hope someone can help!! Cheers

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#2 Re: Right Course??
18/03/2004 16:35

Jonas

Short answer - no. But it won't hinder your application either. There are several kinds of management consultancy, but the marketplace is currently dividing into two tiers - advisory and technology firms.

Within the advisory sector are the Strategy Consultancies - primarily interested in whether you can think logically, communicate clearly and come up with innovative ideas.

At the other extreme, within the technology sector are companies such as EDS, Logica, and parts of IBM, Deloite, and Accenture (to name a few.) To work in this area you'll have to have a very logical brain - and it certainly helps if you like spending hours in front of a laptop.

It sounds like you may fit in at the cross over between advisory and technology - this is where firms such as Deloitte and Accenture generally operate. For the most part they rely on selling tailored business IT suites (such as SAP and Siebel.) However, much of this work requires an upfront analysis of the client's business and potentially recommending new ways of working to them. This kind of work is much more investigative and involves working with the entire range of personnel with a client company. Engineering and science students are often suited to this, but it is common to find a very broad mix of backgrounds.

I hope this helps. The best advice is to check with the companies themselves as to what they look for - often listed on their websites.

Good luck!

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