Thread List
First Page Previous Page Page 149 / 320 Next Page Last Page
Subject#Latest
13 21.01.09
18 20.01.09
25 20.01.09
6 19.01.09
4 19.01.09
12 19.01.09
8 19.01.09
10 18.01.09
8 18.01.09
11 18.01.09
6 16.01.09
3 16.01.09
3 16.01.09
4 15.01.09
15 15.01.09
6 15.01.09
4 14.01.09
9 14.01.09
24 14.01.09
3 14.01.09
5 14.01.09
7 13.01.09
50 13.01.09
9 13.01.09
10 12.01.09
9 12.01.09
6 12.01.09
42 12.01.09
2 12.01.09
1 11.01.09
10 11.01.09
11 11.01.09
13 11.01.09
6 11.01.09
8 11.01.09
5 11.01.09
9 11.01.09
3 11.01.09
2 11.01.09
2 09.01.09
1 09.01.09
8 09.01.09
5 09.01.09
2 09.01.09
9 08.01.09
7 08.01.09
6 08.01.09
10 08.01.09
8 08.01.09
50 07.01.09
First Page Previous Page Page 149 / 320 Next Page Last Page

2 questions for recruiters

 
#1 2 questions for recruiters
07/01/2009 20:36

JR

1. What is the typical pay increase one should pitch for when moving jobs? I am thinking 15-20% but is that too high? (obviously I know this will vary by skillset)

2. If you are currently mid grade is it feasible to shoot for going in at the next level up? i.e in my situation 2.5 years experience (2 yrs analyst, 6 months as consultant) so would look to go in as a second yr consultant and the pay to match but is that likely?

Reply  Quote   
 
#2 RE: 2 questions for recruiters
07/01/2009 23:21

Helena to JR (#1)

I'm on £35k and wondered if i do a PhD and switch to MC in 4 years - whats the expected salary - like £50k ? £60k ?

Reply  Quote   
 
#3 RE: 2 questions for recruiters
08/01/2009 01:26

Ed Hunter to JR (#1)

1) 10% used to be the guideline. This year, 5% or even 0% is more realistic if the role offers other attractions.

2) It is rare to jump grades (even in the years when the market favours candidates). Moving between consultancies, you're actually more likely to get hired at current or one increment below current grade on a trial period since each firm expects you to learn their methodologies and prove your sales abilities.

Reply  Quote   
 
#4 RE: 2 questions for recruiters
08/01/2009 01:32

LS to Helena (#2)

If you spend the next 4 years on a PhD you'll start in consulting on £35k again (i.e. no salary advantage).

Reply  Quote   
 
#5 RE: 2 questions for recruiters
08/01/2009 15:19

anon to LS (#4)

that's why I'm stuck...

I'm in a final salary pension, nobody has these anymore so if I move to defined contribution scheme I need around 10% to cover the additional funding I would need to put into the pension, so no gain there. I'm also likeley to get a promotion in the next couple of years, say 10% rise, plus with a number of years long service benefits I would really need 25% at least to move or it would not be worth my while. This assumes I don't hate my job and can be choosy.

Reply  Quote   
 
#6 RE: 2 questions for recruiters
08/01/2009 16:54

SAC to JR (#1)

In response to your questions the answer to both would be: it depends.

1. It depends on why you're moving, the economic climate, their pay scales, your USP, and how your target company is performing. In good times, there's little incentive to move for less than 15-20% of your current (base) salary. However, if you're looking to gain additional skills, training, exposure to different types of work or clients then you need to weigh up what you value more - the experience or the pay. You need to be realistic though, a sideways move can be a good thing and open doors, but it may take a while to get back on the same salary trajectory that you may have enjoyed by staying with your existing firm. Frankly after 2.5 years it's difficult to expect that experience to command a significant premium.

2. Mid grade shooting for the next level may get you that salary increment, but it would be quite a risk for you and for the hiring firm. Without the experience you will get found out very quickly, most likely at interview stage. It isn't credible to expect to perform at the grade above without the experience.

Reply  Quote   

Top of Page

ThreadID: 51356

Advertise
Your Jobs!