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The Truth...?

 
#1 The Truth...?
29/10/2003 00:00

Infitite

Hi folks.

As someone who is about to graduate with an undergraduate degree shortly, I find myself confronted with a big question - How many people actually get consistantly good grades?

In my experience at University, I've found that the ones with the best grades often tend to be rather one dimensional in life, having focussed a majority of their energies on their books as opposed to experiencing the many other things life has to offer. I know I'm genaralising here, and I apologise if anyone is offended by my statements.

I am keen to know if the really well balanced individuals out there, i.e. those with the potential to be good consultants, have all managed to get an A/A+ average while at Uni.

I am not a bitter individual and niether am I trying to justify mediocre performance. However, I can't help feel that there must be lots of emotionally intelligent and successful consultants out there who didn't always get the top grades, not because of lack of intellligence ,but perhaps because they chose to focus on other aspects of their lives.

During a seminar that McKinseys gave to future graduates at my University last year, one student asked the speaker to sum up in a sentence what sort of individuals McKinseys looks for. The speaker said "That person needs to be an interesting individual."

I leave you all with that thought, and a single question - is the whole issue of grades an overrated one or is it a necessary evil designed to weed out the mediocrity?

Cheers.

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#2 Re: The Truth...?
30/10/2003 00:00

bg

Hi Infitite,

It is said that true intelligence is being able to understand and do things quicker than average. (That is the principle behind psychometric testing.) Therefore the really talented people at university would be able to get all their work done and still find time for extra-curricular activities whereas others would be putting in all nighters....

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#3 Re: The Truth...?
31/10/2003 00:00

Blade

Hi bg.

Your post has a huge ring if truth to it. I am a huge victim of poor time management. I am currently studying my final semester at university. Throughout my degree I have been consistantly compromised in my exams purely because I've been unable to study the full portions, always due to last minute studies. I admit my time management leaves much to be desired. I find that from whatever I am able to cover in my studies, answering any question is easy, no mqatter how difficult that question is. But, as I am often unable to cover the entire examinable content, I am unable to answer at least 10-30% of the paper, purely because I have not studied that part of the syllabus. So, I find that inevitably I end up aswering only 70-80% of the paper, losing out on up to 20% not because I am not intelligent enough or incapable to answer those questions, but because I just don't have a clue what it is about. This unfortunate syndrome has tainted my university education throughout, and I am fed up with coming out of every exam feeling - "if only I'd been able to study those chapters/handouts that I didn't".

No, I am not whining or trying to say that mediocre performance in exams is justifiable. I am admitting to a serious problem I have. I have been consistantly unable to plan my studies successfuly, and very often the grades I recieve are not so much an indicator of my true abilities and knowledge but rather a mark of my incomplete efforts.

I seek some insightful advice and tips on how to rectify this aspect of myself. I am keen to modify my time management habits so I can get the most of my education and other pursuits.

Cheers

P.S: Sorry for the long, possibly boring post, but I've just completed an exam an hour ago, and once again, I was able to attempt only 80% of the paper, i.e. I had to leave out 20 marks as I hadn't been able to study the content associated with those questions. I was able to study the rest of the course purely on account of the allnighter I had to pull last night.

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#4 Re: The Truth...?
01/11/2003 00:00

Nev

The reasons are as manyfold as there are individual cases. However, sometimes people procrastinate because of a low self esteem or fear of failure. I mean, if a person can rationalise their poor marks by the fact that they didn't allow themselves to study effectively, then they can feel okay, because they know they could have done better - if they'd wanted to!!

Time Management is important, but in my opinion it is often merely a symptom of a more fundamental issue. What do you actually want, how true to yourself are you able to be, can you live with yourself after having tried really hard - and failing?

I respectfully suggest therapy. After all, no-one is allowed to practice as a therapist without having undertaken therapy themselves, and isn't consultancy just organisational therapy anyway? If consultancy is the path you want to take, you need to learn what its like to take the medicin.

Learn to love yourself and give yourself the best chances in life, not the best excuses.

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#5 Re: The Truth...?
01/11/2003 00:00

Blade

Hi Nev

Your post, while critical, is absolutely on the money. Thanks, I appreciate the advice. The therapy I plan to take will be self induced. For a long time now, I have avoided being true to myself. Your post reminded me that it is still not too late to adopt better practises and work to my full abilities.

Hopefully, a few years down the track, I'll be able to look back and thank my good fortune at being able to at least realise my shortcoming, in this respect, and improve on them.

Cheers Mate.

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#6 Re: The Truth...?
03/11/2003 00:00

Carol

Hi, as an experienced Consultant who has worked in three countries snd in a variety of industries I would say that grades only get you an initial entry into a good company where you need to spend 2-3 years doing a wide variety of groundwork with increasing challenges and levels of accountability. Only then will you have the knowledge, skills an maturity to offer at a consultancy level. New grads at whatever intellectual level have nothing to offer without real experience as its all theoretical (and bullshit) to those dealing with the issues in todays ecomonic enviromment, especially on a global basis. Your best bet is to join one of the global consultancies as a grauate trainee and find yourself a mentor from within that company, while working hard and delivering results. Carol

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#7 Re: The Truth...?
03/11/2003 00:00

Iain

Blade

I suggest you get some sleep after your all-nighter, and rest your strongest muscle, the brain.

From personal experience it the person on the inside that matters more than the badges/degrees/medals on the outside.

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#8 Re: The Truth...?
03/11/2003 00:00

Iain

Blade

I suggest you get some sleep after your all-nighter, and rest your strongest muscle, the brain.

From personal experience it the person on the inside that matters more than the badges/degrees/medals on the outside.

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