Thread List
First Page Previous Page Page 205 / 308 Next Page Last Page
Subject#Latest
3 03.04.07
37 01.04.07
3 30.03.07
3 30.03.07
3 30.03.07
4 30.03.07
1 30.03.07
1 29.03.07
3 29.03.07
3 29.03.07
5 29.03.07
3 29.03.07
7 29.03.07
5 29.03.07
5 29.03.07
9 29.03.07
2 28.03.07
7 28.03.07
3 28.03.07
5 28.03.07
5 28.03.07
5 28.03.07
1 28.03.07
4 27.03.07
6 27.03.07
45 27.03.07
5 27.03.07
4 27.03.07
9 27.03.07
1 27.03.07
2 27.03.07
2 26.03.07
17 26.03.07
1 26.03.07
4 26.03.07
4 26.03.07
2 26.03.07
1 26.03.07
4 25.03.07
3 25.03.07
2 25.03.07
8 25.03.07
24 25.03.07
3 24.03.07
2 24.03.07
1 24.03.07
5 24.03.07
12 23.03.07
4 23.03.07
18 23.03.07
First Page Previous Page Page 205 / 308 Next Page Last Page

HR Consulting: PhD graduate

 
#1 HR Consulting: PhD graduate
27/03/2007 09:47

Andy

Hi,

I'm wondering about the possibilities of entering HR consulting. I have a Masters in HR and have just submitted a PhD in Industrial Relations. Both are from top 10 Universities.

I'm currently working on a University HR research project, looking at HR strategy in several blue chip organisations. This have involved a significant amount of time working with the case organisations.

However, I'd like to do something more practical and hence my interest in consulting. Is it viable?

Reply  Quote   
 
#2 RE: HR Consulting: PhD graduate
27/03/2007 10:48

freebie to Andy (#1)

Yup. Get firing off those CV's and grab yourself a role as an 'experienced hire'.

Don't lean too heavily on your qualifications though, you really need to prove that you can translate what you've learnt into tangible results in a live environment because that's what you will be employed to do.

If you haven't got any experience get a role in a good quality industry for a couple of years and work your socks off to build a CV which marks you out as a mover and shaker.

Then re-apply.

Many Doc's, MA's and MBA's think that they'll walk into a role because they know so much, but that's unlikely as most firms will want to know that you have the skills and maturity through experience to get traction on all that knowledge.

Good luck.

www.myadviceisfree.com

Reply  Quote   
 
#3 RE: HR Consulting: PhD graduate
27/03/2007 11:00

freebie to Andy (#1)

Yup. Get firing off those CV's and grab yourself a role as an 'experienced hire'.

Don't lean too heavily on your qualifications though, you really need to prove that you can translate what you've learnt into tangible results in a live environment because that's what you will be employed to do.

If you haven't got any experience get a role in a good quality industry for a couple of years and work your socks off to build a CV which marks you out as a mover and shaker.

Then re-apply.

Many Doc's, MA's and MBA's think that they'll walk into a role because they know so much, but that's unlikely as most firms will want to know that you have the skills and maturity through experience to get traction on all that knowledge.

Good luck.

www.myadviceisfree.com

Reply  Quote   
 
#4 RE: HR Consulting: PhD graduate
27/03/2007 17:31

LondonW8 to Andy (#1)

Hi Andy,

My experience (as a manager in the HR consulting practice of a leading 'big brand') is that there is good demand for HR consulting skills.

FYI - HR consulting work usually breaks down into the 3 distinct areas: (a) transforming the HR function (b) employee performance (sales, contact centre, IT, finance) or (3) general change management. It may be useful to show you how you where your partic experiences would best fit with this in mind.

And completely second previous post: key will be showing you are thinking about how your insights might translate into actionable, measurable activities with a client. Whilst you dont have direct client experience, it will stand you in good stead if you thought through how you IMAGINE it might work.

All the best,

LondonW8

Reply  Quote   

Top of Page

ThreadID: 26817

Advertise
Your Jobs!