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Opportunities

 
#1 Opportunities
29/03/2006 17:04

adam

Hi,

I am looking at starting a career in consulting. I do not have a degree but have 12 years, business, sales and IT experience aswell as successfully starting and running my own IT company for 4 years. What is the best direction I should take to get an opportunity to train and learn and become a successful consultant.

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#2 Re: Opportunities
30/03/2006 06:52

Alan Davies

What sort of network do you have ? What are your project management skills like ?

If you can answer strongly to the above, you could apply directly to the Big 4 accounting houses / Accenture / IBM / PA to come in at a Senior Consultant / Manager level, assuming that you are now in your early 30s.

If you leave it much longer, it'll be harder to get in.

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#3 Re: Opportunities
30/03/2006 15:02

It is for life not just for xmas

From reading your experience - on paper it looks like you have all the required consulting skills, potentially gaps in structured analytical and diagnostic skills. Would suggest getting hold of "the mckinsey way" - great book to get your head into the basic consulting toolkits.

The most valuable experience you might have is being able to sell a solution to a customer's issues and then being actually able to deliver against it.

Final opinion - avoid the big 4 and top tier strategy houses: they operate very standard career models and generally are not flexible about the career paths and options they offer. They follow a pretty prescriptive approach. Very much based on resource profiles and checklists. Simplistically they look for people with relevant skills they can resell onto large engagement. Try the smaller niche consultancies in any specialism that interests you (probably technology based from your experience) and you will find them more open and flexible you

Would also suggest visiting the Inst. of mgmt consulting (imc.co.uk) and mgmt consulting association (mca.co.uk).

Potentially I would ask a very serious question - why do you want to get into consulting?? If you are used to being your own boss - you MIGHT not enjoy being part of a "partner's army of ants".

If you know any headhunters personally (decent ones!!, not the bodyshops)or even better have any mates or professional contacts - get the lows and highs of working in a consultancy type environment. Does not matter whether it is strategy, ops, process, IT or functional domains, there are some base common denominators about this career.

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